POST OPERATIVE CARE

Post-operative care at our medical clinic encompasses three main categories: after surgical removal of teeth, following placement of implants and bone grafting, and post orthognathic surgery. Tailored care is our priority for effective healing and optimal outcomes.

Following Surgical Removal of Teeth

The recovery experience following the surgical removal of teeth is highly variable between individuals.

All patients undergo completely normal and expected challenges including discomfort, swelling, minor bleeding and
difficulty in mouth opening. The duration and severity are dependent on many factors including the complexity of the procedure and the patients normal body response.

After a general anaesthetic, a carer should be available to accompany you from hospital and provide support for at
least 24 hours.

Allow your body to recover and rest. Stay hydrated, avoid physical exertion, and take your prescribed medications.

Avoid lying flat. Sleep with your head elevated to 30-45deg as this will greatly help minimise swelling.

Gauze packs are crucial in controlling both normal and unanticipated bleeding. These should be folded into quarters and placed over the surgical site with firm pressure applied (biting down) for 45min.

Gentle mouth rinsing with Savacol should commence 12 hours after the procedure. Approximately 20ml (2 x tablespoons) should be gently rolled around the oral cavity to help reduce potential infection and improve oral hygiene. Normal tooth brushing should commence the following day and be mindful of the extraction sites.

Maintain a healthy diet and consume soft foods or what you feel able. Maintain ample hydration and avoid overtly sweet or hot fluids / foods for the first 3 days

Discomfort and swelling are an inevitable outcomes of surgery and are highly variable in intensity and duration. Adhering to the aftercare instructions and medications should see this subside around 3-4 days after the procedure. Occasionally, bruising may develop which moves downwards over days to weeks.

Minor bleeding often occurs and is effectively controlled through firm pressure to the wound with gauze packs.

Nausea and vomiting can occur, especially following a general anaesthetic and may also occur due to sensitivities to pain medication. Should this occur, then cease strong pain killers and ensure adequate hydration.

Sutures are self-dissolving and occurs in 7-10 days. Occasionally, this can be earlier and is rarely an issue.

Regardless of how well you feel, you must avoid physical exercise and ensure your head is elevated for 4 days following surgery.

Smoking significantly increases the likeliness of complications including severe uncontrolled pain, serious infection and delayed healing. Alcohol may be detrimental to healing and can have dangerous interactions with your medications.

Mouth rinsing that is too vigorous or frequent, increases the risk of further bleeding and development of severe pain.

Infection is rare but could present as ongoing / unresolved pain AND swelling that continues to increase after day 3, difficulty in mouth opening or discharge and feeling unwell.

Excessive bleeding is uncommon but is very reliably controlled with firm pressure with gauze packs which may need to stay in place for prolonged periods.

Uncontrolled pain once swelling has resolved may indicate a ‘dry socket’ due to loss of the clot within the tooth socket with main causes being smoking, excessive rinsing or infection.

After a period of weeks to months, you may have a small ‘bone splinter’ which can feel sharp and irritate the gums but usually self resolves.

A prescription for medications has been provided to help control symptoms and improve your recovery experience. These should commence prior to numbness wearing off (2 hrs for awake procedures and 4-6hrs after general anaesthetic).

Medications may include Oxycodone or Tapentadol (strong pain killer), Paracetamol (mild pain killer), Celebrex or Meloxicam (ant-inflammatory / pain killer) and Savacol mouth rinse.

Your care and recovery experience are of paramount importance. You will receive a phone call 1 week following the procedure to ensure you have experienced an uneventful recovery.

If there are challenges that are unresolved then your first point of contact should be to phone the clinic or email info@rhuggins.com.au

If an unexpected emergency occurs after hours, you should present to the Emergency Department at your nearest hospital.

Following Placement of Implants & Bone Grafting

The recovery experience following the placement of a dental implant or grafting procedures is highly variable between individuals.

All patients undergo completely normal and expected challenges including discomfort, swelling, minor bleeding and difficulty in mouth opening. The duration and severity are dependent on many factors including the complexity of the procedure and the patients normal body response.

After a general anaesthetic, a carer should be available to accompany you from hospital and provide support for at least 24 hours.

Allow your body to recover and rest. Stay hydrated, avoid physical exertion, and take your prescribed medications.

Avoid lying flat. Sleep with your head elevated to 30-45deg as this will greatly help minimise swelling.

Gauze packs are crucial in controlling both normal and unanticipated bleeding. These should be folded into quarters and placed over the surgical site with firm pressure applied (biting down) for 45min.

Gentle mouth rinsing with Savacol should commence 12 hours after the procedure. Approximately 20ml (2 x tablespoons) should be gently rolled around the oral cavity to help reduce potential infection and improve oral hygiene. Normal tooth brushing should commence the following day and be mindful of the extraction sites.

For sinus lift procedures, avoid nose blowing for 2 weeks.

Maintain a healthy diet and consume soft foods or what you feel able and strictly avoid eating over the implant site. Maintain ample hydration and avoid overtly sweet or hot fluids / foods for the first 3 days.

Discomfort and swelling are an inevitable outcome of surgery and are highly variable in intensity and duration. Adhering to the aftercare instructions and medications should see this subside around 3-4 days after the procedure. Occasionally, bruising may develop which moves downwards over days to weeks.

Minor bleeding often occurs and is effectively controlled through firm pressure to the wound with gauze packs.

Nausea and vomiting can occur, especially following a general anaesthetic and may also occur due to sensitivities to pain medication. Should this occur, then cease strong pain killers and ensure adequate hydration.

Sutures are self-dissolving and occurs in 7-10 days. Occasionally, this can be earlier and is rarely an issue.

If a bone graft has been performed, it is not uncommon for small ‘gritty’ granules to be extruded. A sinus lift procedure may also result in minor bleeding from the nose.

Regardless of how well you feel, you must avoid physical exercise and ensure your head is elevated for 4 days following surgery.

Smoking significantly increases the likeliness of the implant failing. Other complications including severe uncontrolled pain, serious infection, and delayed healing. Alcohol may be detrimental to healing and can have dangerous interactions with your medications.

Mouth rinsing that is too vigorous or frequent, increases the risk of further bleeding.

Eat on the opposite site to the implant site and avoid vigorous brushing of the area.

Infection is rare which could present as ongoing / unresolved pain AND swelling that continues to increase after day 3, difficulty in mouth opening, bad taste or discharge and feeling unwell.

Excessive bleeding is uncommon but is very reliably controlled with firm pressure with gauze packs. These may need to stay in place for prolonged periods.

A prescription for medications has been provided to help control symptoms and improve your recovery experience. These should commence prior to numbness wearing off (2 hrs for awake procedures and 4-6hrs after general anaesthetic).

Medications may include Oxycodone or Tapentadol (strong pain killer), Paracetamol (mild pain killer), Celebrex or Meloxicam (ant-inflammatory / pain killer) and Savacol mouth rinse.

Your care and recovery experience are of paramount importance. You will receive a phone call 1 week following the procedure to ensure you have experienced an uneventful recovery. There will also be a further review in approximately 3 months to ensure adequate integration of the implant prior to the crown being placed.

If there are challenges that are unresolved then your first point of contact should be to phone the clinic or email info@rhuggins.com.au

If an unexpected emergency occurs after hours, you should present to the Emergency Department at your nearest hospital.

Following Orthognathic Surgery

The recovery experience following orthognathic (corrective jaw surgery) is highly variable between individuals.

All patients undergo completely normal and expected challenges including discomfort, swelling, minor bleeding and difficulty in mouth opening. The duration and severity are dependent on many factors including the complexity of the procedure and the patients normal body response.

After a general anaesthetic, a carer should be available to accompany you from hospital and provide support for at least 3 days.

Allow your body to recover and rest. Stay hydrated, avoid physical exertion, and take your prescribed medications.

Sleep with your head elevated to 30-45deg, do not lie flat and strictly avoid bending over for the first 2 weeks.

Maintain a healthy diet and consume soft foods for 6 weeks. Maintain ample hydration and avoid overtly sweet or hot fluids / foods for the first 3 days.

Gauze packs are crucial in controlling both normal and unanticipated bleeding. These should be folded into quarters and placed over the surgical site with firm pressure applied (biting down) for 45min.

Gentle mouth rinsing with Savacol should commence 12 hours after the procedure. Approximately 20ml (2 x tablespoons) should be gently rolled around the oral cavity to help reduce potential infection and improve oral hygiene. Gentle tooth brushing should commence the following day.

Elastic bands are often placed between the upper and lower braces to help control your bite over the coming weeks. These can be removed during mealtimes and should be replaced every 2 days. It is important they are replaced in the same direction and a photo is often helpful in ensuring this.

For expansion surgery of the upper jaw, a ‘key’ is used to turn the device from front toward the back. This should commence on day 2 with one turn in the morning and at night. This should continue until advised by your orthodontist.

Discomfort and swelling are inevitable outcomes of surgery and are highly variable in intensity and duration. Adhering to the aftercare instructions and medications should see this subside around 5-6 days after the procedure. Occasionally, bruising may develop which moves downwards over days to weeks.

Minor bleeding from the mouth or nose often occurs and is effectively controlled through firm pressure with gauze packs.

Nausea and vomiting can occur, following a general anaesthetic and may also occur due to sensitivities to pain medication. Should this occur, then cease strong pain killers and ensure adequate hydration.

Sutures are self-dissolving and occurs in 7-10 days. Occasionally, this can be earlier and is rarely an issue.

Regardless of how well you feel, you must avoid physical exercise and ensure your head is elevated for 4 days following surgery.

Smoking considerably increases the likeliness of significant complications which may include, serious infection and delayed healing. Alcohol may be detrimental to healing and can have dangerous interactions with your medications. Eating that require firm chewing with your teeth can affect the healing of bone and the way the jaws come together.

Mouth rinsing that is too vigorous or frequent, increases the risk of further bleeding.

Infection is rare which could present as increased swelling that continues to escalate after day 5 along with a bad taste or discharge and feeling unwell.

Excessive bleeding is uncommon but is very reliably controlled with firm pressure with gauze packs. These may need to stay in place for prolonged periods.

A prescription for medications has been provided to help control symptoms and improve your recovery experience. These may include Oxycodone or Tapentadol IR (shorting acting analgesic), Targin or Tapentadol SR (long-acting strong analgesic) Paracetamol (mild pain analgesic), Celebrex or Meloxicam (ant-inflammatory / pain killer) and Savacol mouth rinse.

Your care and recovery experience are of paramount importance. You will receive a clinical reviews over the following weeks to ensure the recovery continues as expected.

If there are challenges that are unresolved then your first point of contact should be to phone the clinic or email info@rhuggins.com.au

If an unexpected emergency occurs after hours, you should present to the Emergency Department at your nearest hospital.